Featured Spotlight: TeenCP in 2015!


Hi All,

I do hope your November is off to a good start! I’d like to give a warm thank you to James Randolph of Artiscend, a digital archive spotlighting inspiring stories from artists, musicians & people from all over. This article below is a lovely profile piece on me & TeenCP. I really appreciate how genuine these words come across, especially as they are so personal to me & everyone who has been alongside my internet journey. The power of voice proves to be yet another way to extend our reach beyond amazement!

What is Artiscend?

“Our job is to be the avenue for the talented craftsmen and artists who want to see their work appropriately spotlighted and for the patrons of those artists to have a place to express their appreciation.We always feel like those who deserve it most are those who are appreciated least and we hope to help change that. Musicians can receive direct support from their fans,  Application designers and game developers will have a platform to receive credit and contribution from the technology they’ve created and inspired. Wherever the artists are changing the world, we’ll be there to help them realize their vision.”

Click me: >>>Artiscend Article on TeenCP

Hope you enjoy it, I know I did! :)


“Give a girl the right shoes and she’ll conquer the world” – Marilyn Monroe


Hi everyone,

I’m Jessica and I’m 23 years old. I was diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy when I was 4 months old in a unique way. I got pneumonia which caused one of my lungs to collapse. When that happened I lost oxygen, and as all of us know thats one of the ways to get CP. I was placed in a coma for a week, and eventually I became healthy again. From a young age I had to become a fighter. Cerebral Palsy has a funny way of forcing you to get thick skin. Eventually you learn to let the looks and comments roll off your shoulders, because in my head those people who say things don’t matter. I have a mild case of CP that affects me from my waist down on both legs. I got the percutaneous lengthening surgery twice. Once for my hamstrings and the other for my achilles tendon. The surgeries were life changing for me, it gave me a chance to have loose muscles along with stretching everyday. Also for the past two years I have been getting botox injections in leg muscle to help with my spasticity. Im loose and flexible now with very little spasticity but still walk with a limp.

When I was young I never thought twice about it, I never knew anything was wrong until kindergarten. My Cerebral Palsy never held me back, I did everything I wanted to do. It might have taken me a little longer, but I did it and thats all that matters in the long run. I pretty much came to terms with all things related to Cerebral Palsy, Physical therapy, stretching, gate training, strengthening exercises, but the one thing I can’t come to terms with is SHOES! I’m sure you all can agree with me having CP and shoe shopping is not fun! It’s the one type of shopping I dread and try to put off. After having years of experience of shoe shopping with CP I think I got it down to a science. I have some shoes & tricks that I want to share with you all.


Sneakers– I am definitely a Nike girl! Although I am picky with the weight of the sneaker, I usually get the sneakers used for running, I find that these are not to light but not too heavy. Right Now I love the Nike Dual Fusion line.

Slippers– Even though slippers are meant for comfort it’s still important to keep your feet in the right position all the time. I am in love with the brand Vionic! They have an arch and a heel cup, they are made for people who need medical footwear. I have the Relax Luxe they are my favorite.

Sandals– I’m definitely the most difficult with sandals, It took me a while to feel comfortable and confident in them. I have two brands that I will only wear they are Bare Traps & BOC. For me finding a sandal with a sneaker like bottom works best. I also make sure the sandal has a ankle strap for extra support. When I walk in the BareTraps & BOC sandals it’s almost compatible to sneakers.

Sandal Tips– I hate when my foot slides around in my sandals.It is impossible to wear an orthotic with some sandals. My fun tip is I buy the Dr. Scholls gel heel cushions and trim them to fit my shoe then glue them to the inside by the heel & the toes.

Boots– Again I have to say I love the brand BareTraps & BOC for boots. If I do stray away from those brands I always make sure the the boot is flexible & has a rubber bottom so you don’t slip! Again I look for that sneaker like bottom for comfort & I make sure I can slip in my Orthotics.

Heels– Wearing heels is a struggle but lets be real having CP and balancing on a stiletto is out of the question for me, and thats something that took me a long time to accept. I would give anything to walk in heels and be confident and comfortable, but thats not always the case. I am not a toe walker so feeling the pressure of being pushed onto my toes gives me anxiety, I feel like I’m going to topple over. As of right now I only wear a heel with boots or booties, I normally wear a low heel about 1 inch to 1 1/2 inch. I make sure they have a rubber bottom and is a flexible shoe. Right now I have the Kenneth Cole Women’s Riding Boot. I love them and I’m very confident in them, and thats all that matters. I recently have been gate training in wedges so I can wear them outside and not only in the comfort of my house.

Orthotics– I wore day and night AFOs until I was 17 years old. I am now able to buy over the counter orthotics. I wear them in every shoe except for sandals. Two of my favorites are Vionic and Spenco.

Now, I am definitely not a Doctor but these are just some shoes and tips that work best for me. Also I would like to thank Katy for making this blog, it’s always nice to relate & talk to people who are going through the same thing as you!

xoxo Jessica

A Myriad of Musings (over coffee & croissant)


This morning I walked into the (quietest) bank and I must have made some noticeable noise with my flip flops because two people turned around and gave me “the look.” They looked at my feet, my face, and then back at my feet. It happens nearly every day but today these glances felt different. It was quick, almost undetectable by anyone else. They probably didn’t even realize they were staring a few seconds too long, but it was obvious to me. It felt a little disheartening, mostly because it is unwanted. I don’t like this kind of attention, as would anyone who deals with a physical disability or noticeable condition. I just want to go about my business some days but it is inevitable. It is just a part of having CP, I guess.

I don’t know why it bothers me so much. I know that it is human to be curious, interested, concerned etc… but there are some eyes that linger a little too long and that seems impolite. I wanted to look at both of them and say “what?!” As if to wake them up and help them understand that yes, people aren’t all the same. Our bodies all carry us through life in different ways. No, I am not in a wheelchair but yes, I have a disability. Yes, I look so “normal” but I have CP and I am not afraid to share that; it’s always been and always will be apart of me. I’m good with it, trust me. Can you be good with it too?

That is what I want to say to people sometimes but usually I will walk away if I don’t feel very strongly about it. At the end of the day, it doesn’t really matter but I think it is good to speak up in moments like these if it is warranted; it is an opportunity to education those who are ignorant of disability. It takes a lot of courage to do so and you might risk the chance of drawing more attention to yourself, but it may be worth it. You might embarrass that person and that is okay. A lot of people need to realize that to have a disability does not make us less capable of handling the opinions and reactions of others. Countless times, people have approached me and simply asked if I was okay and in response I would say, “yes thank you, I have cerebral palsy. My muscles are just tighter on this side of my body.” And I am putting into words what they have already seen! But they act as if they suddenly asked the worst question in the world, and tell me how sorry they are for bringing it up–as if I am as uncomfortable as they are with talking about it.

Well that reaction needs to change, but I wonder, will it? I wonder why things are this way in a world where there is so much diversity already. When will it be okay to exist in the grey area of our humanity? I mean this in terms of disability but also in other binaries. Think about it: we aren’t always normal OR disabled, republican OR democrat, black OR white, happy OR sad. Sometimes we are just fine, we become injured, we change. We are just bodies and odd mixtures of opinions, emotions, and spiritualities. We identify with ourselves and the world around us in this way, but is life really meant to be categorized in such strict boxes? (Yes, physical characteristics may need more clear definitions) but shouldn’t it be okay to be sometimes this OR that?

That is really why I like to talk about having a disability so openly because I believe it encourages empathy and understanding in others; even if it is to one person at a time, a one-on-one conversation does make an impact. So if there is a grey area to everything, I passionately support the notion that it is “normal” to fall in between these identifiers as we move through life. That’s just it– life is transitional. We go through stages, and phases, and we develop, and grow. Every day we wake up, we discover something new about ourselves and the world around us!

Much of this is my perspective from my own experiences and understanding of things I’ve read and discussed with others and you are free to dismiss it… but either way, I hope to have enlightened the way you think about having CP in the context of just being who you are, no matter who you choose to be today. Thanks for reading. :)





Join us on Twitter for #CPChatNow !! (And Guest Blog on TeenCP!!)


Hi Everyone! Katy here– I know it’s been WAY too long…

But I am trying to get back into the swing of things on TeenCP now that I have officially graduated from college! (yes I am no longer a teen– but 23 is still cool right?) Anyway, I am going to be on Twitter next week to answer any questions you may have about how to introduce your CP to the new people we meet in daily life.

All you have to do is:

A) Have a Twitter account

B) Hashtag #CPChatNow with any questions you have regarding our topic of the night:

“Introducing Your Cerebral Palsy When Meeting New People”

C) Tag me, Katy @teencp if you can, so I can answer your questions more directly

D) Have fun!!

P.S. If you don’t have questions specifically for me, please still join in for the last hour of open discussion where you can bring up anything that’s on your mind about your experience with CP. That’s what this is all about!

You might be wondering– What is CP Chat Now? Or who is behind this awesome social movement? Well look no further than this link!  What is #CPChatNow?

Thanks Zachary Fenell & Blake Henry for starting this Twitter chat for the CP Community, you guys are awesome and so dedicated to creating such a unique space for us all to connect with other people like ourselves! I am so excited to host your next Q&A session, I am so honored you thought of me to do so!

Lastly, I hope to be on here more often, my friends. If you would still like to guest blog, I will now be checking teencerebralpalsy@gmail.com regularly and can help you tell your own story with CP. It would be a huge help if you could please fill out this contact form (even if you already have) so I can get more organized and start posting new content from all of YOU, my TeenCP peeps!! I think everyone is ready to start reading some exciting stuff. :)


To Surgery…And Beyond!

Hi TeenCP!! I’m so excited to be back and writing about my latest excitement. I am now finishing up the final months of my freshman year of college and have been introduced to the medical opportunity I’ve always dreamed of!

All my life, I was told that I had Spastic Monoplegia (a.k.a  tight muscles only in my left leg, complete with a limp, and balance problems that were given to me shortly after I was born) But a few weeks ago when I visited with a new surgeon, I was given a new look into really how my leg muscles were moving. It has been my goal in the past few years to reach my full potential physically and now, I was finally getting what I saw as the chance of a lifetime. Back in January, I did a “Gait Analysis” at a special lab in New York City. From this, the doctor would be able to see how exactly my muscles move and then decide what course of action to take so I can walk as well as possible That day was actually pretty cool-therapists covered my entire body in little ball-shaped sensors and used 3-D Motion Capture cameras to film me as I walked back and forth across the room. It was unlike anything I’ve ever done before, and what was even more awesome was the fact that I was utilizing the same basic technology that filmmakers use to shoot movies like The Polar Express. (Fun Fact: That’s why Tom Hanks looks extremely similar to his animated character!) As it turns out from the results of the gait analysis, my Cerebral Palsy can actually be considered “asymmetrically diplegic” because my right hamstrings an adductors are also abnormally tight. It was definitely a shock to have my diagnosis changed a bit after 19 years, but to be honest, it didn’t really bother me! Just hearing that a doctor could help me walk better was basically some of the best news of my entire life. Yes, I am actually excited about the surgery that I will be having at the end of May.

For the sake of keeping things “even” both of my legs will be operated on. My hamstrings and adductors will be released, meaning the doctor will “snip” them allowing them to relax. Together, this will not only give me better flexibility, but also prevent “scissor gait” and the turning in of my knee on my left side. Also, my left achilles tendon will be lengthened (by cutting the outer sheath of the muscle, allowing the tendon to expand) and this will help me walk “heel-toe” with a more regular stride. In total, five of my leg muscles are going to be operated on, and surprisingly I will be leaving the hospital with the ability to walk (using a walker), a short cast on my left leg, and splints to wear at night while I sleep. There’s going to be lots of Physical Therapy involved (of course) but I look at the process with a “no pain, no gain mindset” This Jersey Girl is hoping to be back on the beach as soon as I get my cast off…even if it means trudging through the sand with that new walker of mine! (How’s THAT for PT??) Also, I’m hoping to be able to eventually go ice-skating and zip-lining (two things I’ve never been able to do but have always hoped to try) once I gain my strength back! I like being able to look forward getting on the rink at Rockefeller Center or climbing to the top of a tree then flying through the air. It may sound a little crazy, but no one ever said that when you have CP, you can’t do these things!!

Since I’ve gotten the news that I’m finally able to have all of this surgery, I’ve done a ton of reflecting. How are you supposed to react when the thing you’ve dreamed about your entire life suddenly comes true? I now feel this awesome new sense of confidence and readiness to take take control of my body that I hadn’t necessarily recognized during my high-school years, and I think that’s one of the reasons that I’m not anxious about what’s in store for me. Maybe to those of you who have gone through this process before, I could be sounding slightly naive…but I can’t imagine being afraid of a medical  journey that basically encompasses all I’ve ever wanted for myself. One of my favorite quotes is, “Worrying is like a rocking chair, it gives you something to do, but doesn’t get you anywhere.” I know that with  all the support I have from my family and friends, lots of determination and a couple of chocolate milkshakes, I’ll be able to conquer this journey and come out not only feeling stronger physically, but mentally as well. Throughout my teenage years, I’ve learned that the difference in how you feel about yourself and your future all depends on how you look at things. More than that, I’ve been re-inspired to never lose faith that everything will fall into place. Just thinking about the day when I’m completely finished with my rehab and walking in a brand new way gives me butterflies-it is all the motivation I need!!!

Keep on keepin on guys!! :)